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It's strange they don't call it 'violence'...

It's strange that governments don't call it 'violence' when daily they send people to their deaths by deporting them.

It's strange that governments don't call it 'violence' when they send thousands of poor people to kill (or be killed by) other poor people in one senseless war after another.

From Judi Chamberlin: The Ex-Patients' Movement: Where We've Been and Where We're Going

cemental stealth (aka mental "health") survivors articulate ideas like "sane chauvanism" and "mentalism" to denote oppressive ways of seeing folks having difficulties in living. Judi Chamberlin, published in a prestigious journal, articulates such in her overview of a mostly 1970s-1980s ex-mental patient liberation movement. Excerpts and link included.

Valuable insights from David Ingleby, re: "Ideology and the Human Sciences"

"We should recognize that the infiltration of value judgements into 'objective' terminology is not just loose talk, a psychological weakness of scientists; to classify actions which are seen as a threat to society as malignant process is a means of repression more final and devastating in its effects than any overt condemnation."--David Ingelby (important for understanding the culture of oppression in which human scientists, including psychiatrists, operate within)

Why I find the philosophy behind 'non-violence' to be problematic

First and foremost is the fact that it can serve to re-silence and re-victimize those who have already experienced violence firsthand, and thus by default serves to exclude such innocent victims from any effective movement for social change.

Fear of 'madness' (and society's response to it) in a historical context

I have to wonder if the reticence about speaking out on abuses/prejudice aimed at people with a psychiatric label, or about the inherently oppressive nature of psychiatry and the 'mental health' system themselves isn't rooted in peoples' fear of their own capacity for madness as well as being rooted in another long-standing historical prejudice.

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